Friday Fictioneers: Protesting for Her Future

Welcome to Friday Fictioneers where each week close to 100 people participate in a flash fiction challenge based on a photo prompt.

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This week’s photo ~ Copyright: David Stewart

And now my 100 word story:

It was 1966 and my older sister had dropped out of college claiming it was an institution forced upon us by politicians who wanted to enslave us.

I loved college and I loved Bill. We had planned to marry after graduation. But now Bill wants to go to California. My sister has a place for us in a commune. I don’t want to live in a commune. I want to live in an apartment downtown.

He wants me to be one of them damned hippies. I will show him. I will sit here in protest until I get my way!

36 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers: Protesting for Her Future

  1. I’m with you and the downtown apartment–hope you don’t end up waving goodbye to Bill from your elevated post as he drives west into the sunset. Good story.

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  2. Funny take. I’d advise her to forget about Bill too. Let her finish her degree first. She never knows what might happen later. If he loves her he’ll change his mind. This is THE test! 🙂

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  3. Dear Dawn,

    Bill will come to his senses once he learns that there’s no future in the commune. Good for your MC for knowing what she wanted. Hope she came to her senses and took a stand instead of a sit-in. 😉 She’d be better off without Bill. Well done and nice glancing use of the prompt.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  4. We each have to find our own way. I know some people who are very happy living without modern conveniences. Whatever blows your skirt up, I always say. Me, I tend to enjoy running water and air conditioning. Nice story, Dawn.

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    • Thank you kind sir. Funny, we had a similar conversation yesterday while playing one of those games where you answer questions from a box of pre-printed cards. One of the questions was “Which decade would you like to have lived in?” My answer was the next one. I’m spoiled and like my modern conveniences as well.

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  5. The irony of this story is delicious, darling! This is my favourite of yours to dare.

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  6. Pingback: Jacob’s Ladder – Friday Fictioneers | Being the Memoirs of Helena Hann-Basquiat, Dilettante.

  7. Bill will end up with the sister and 30 years later regret it all. I could see this happening back then.

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  8. I love the “I’ll sit here in protest until I get my own way”
    I understand what Helena calls, and you agree with, as irony.
    I see it though not so much as irony that she uses a protest against Bill in order to get her own way but that she sees protests as a means to get her own way. She probably should just stick to holding her breath until she turns blue or simply have a tantrum which I suspect has always been her form of protest. Bill needs to run to that commune fast. She needs therapy.

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