A Lingering Look at Architecture: March ~ Old Town Winchester, Virginia

This month’s challenge topic is: Architecture Field Trips in which I encourage you to share some of the beautiful architecture you have captured from your travels; even if you are like me and don’t get to travel very far.

This challenge runs from March 1st through March 31st. Please leave trackbacks or pingbacks to this post and tag them with A Lingering Look at Architecture so we may locate your entries easier or, if you prefer,comment with your URL in the comment section.

For more information please see our title page.

Today I am looking at the core of the Winchester Historic District that is set by a four block pedestrian mall walk-way along Loudoun Street from Cork to Piccadilly Streets. The mall is flanked by numerous late 19th and early 20th century buildings of brick construction, two and three stories in height.

Solenberger’s Hardware Store:

Located at 140 N. Main Street since about 1908.

Located at 140 N. Main Street since about 1908.

Rouss Fire Company: The oldest fire house yet in use in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

November 11, 1895 over 4,000 people gathered for the corner stone laying.

November 11, 1895 over 4,000 people gathered for the corner stone laying.

Hills Keep(w)# (1)

Hills Keep(w)# (2)

No post of mine about architecture would be complete without a church. This is the First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church(w)

Today the Godfrey Miller Home is operated as a Fellowship Center.

This historic home was purchased by John Miller in 1812 and continued in the Miller family until 1938 when Margaretta Sperry Miller donated the home to Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church to be used as a residence for elderly ladies.

This historic home was purchased by John Miller in 1812 and continued in the Miller family until 1938 when Margaretta Sperry Miller donated the home to Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church to be used as a residence for elderly ladies.

John Miller, son of Godfrey Miller – the immigrant, and Anna Maria Kurtz was born in Winchester on March 22, 1775. He married Margaretta Sperry on April 14, 1803 and they had five children the youngest of whom was Godfrey Sperry Miller for whom the home was named by his daughter Margaretta Sperry Miller.

John Miller, son of Godfrey Miller – the immigrant, and Anna Maria Kurtz was born in Winchester on March 22, 1775. He married Margaretta Sperry on April 14, 1803 and they had five children the youngest of whom was Godfrey Sperry Miller for whom the home was named by his daughter Margaretta Sperry Miller.

The Old Court House Civil War Museum is a historic building with graffiti from both Northern and Southern soldiers which also houses a nationally recognized collection of over 3,000 Civil War artifacts.  Situated on the Loudoun Street Walking Mall in Old Town Winchester, Virginia, this Georgian style court house was used as a hospital, barracks and prison by both sides during the War.

The Old Court House Civil War Museum is a historic building with graffiti from both Northern and Southern soldiers which also houses a nationally recognized collection of over 3,000 Civil War artifacts. Situated on the Loudoun Street Walking Mall in Old Town Winchester, Virginia, this Georgian style court house was used as a hospital, barracks and prison by both sides during the War.

Masonic Lodge:

Hiram Lodge No 21

Hiram Lodge No 21

Residents have fought the closure of The Old Town Post Office and so far, have won.

A more modern PO resides a few miles from this one in a "newer" part of town.

A more modern PO resides a few miles from this one in a “newer” part of town.

Farmer's and Merchants Bank Building(w)

Wells Fargo Bank(w)

8 thoughts on “A Lingering Look at Architecture: March ~ Old Town Winchester, Virginia

  1. Love the fire station. I haven’t been to Winchester in a long time. We used to travel through, but now take the interstate past. Got married there. 🙂

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