Asparagus Gone to Seed

During a recent visit to the gardens at The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, my friend Kathy pointed out this asparagus, gone to seed.

I didn’t quite understand everything she said when she said “Gone to Seed”, but I got the gist of it, and understood it more when I googled it and learned that: Asparagus plants emerge in spring as edible spears. These edible spears can be harvested from two to six weeks, or until the spears become spindly and start to open. Once the spears pop open, they’ll become tall, ferny plants. This ferny growth collects energy from the sun, which is stored in the roots. Strong growth after the harvest ensures healthy spears the next season. Along with the ferny growth, female plants produce red seeds. These seeds drop to the ground and become new plants if not removed.

What I loved most about what she told me was that these beautiful sprigs look incredible in an arrangement.

She has been working with our friend at Lush and Local creating flower arrangements for weddings, birthdays, and any number of reasons to send flowers, including my favorite; just because. and the sprigs of an Asparagus Gone to Seed, are a wonderful addition to many of the arrangements.

Color Your World 2019: Asparagus

10 thoughts on “Asparagus Gone to Seed

  1. We have an asparagus patch and we have had a few weeks of the spears and now we will be leaving it to grow up. I have to admit we do not fertilize it or even weed it and every year we have a bumper crop of delicious asparagus spears.

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  2. Pingback: Color your World: Atomic Tangerine | Tourmaline .

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